Was Christ Just to Pharisees

Without some knowledge of the written form of the "Tradition of the Pharisees," the Babylonian Talmud, one is unable to intelligently judge whether Jesus Christ was fair and just in His acid denunciations of Pharisaism, or not. One needs proof, offered by the irrefutable exhibits from Jewish authorities (set forth elsewhere herein) that the Talmud reverses every one of the Ten Commandments, the teachings of Moses and the Prophets, and enshrines their opposites under a "whited sepulchre" which is a disguise for murder and "all uncleanness," as Christ charged. Murder of non-Pharisees is always permitted; theft, sodomy, incest, rape are all permitted. For example, the righteousness of grown men violating baby girls under three is a favorite topic for discussion in book after book of the Talmud.

Talmudic literature is one long paean of praise for the very name Babylon, and all that it means to Babylonian Talmudism today, whereas it is a term of reproach in Old and New Testaments.

Note the Foreword to the first English translation of the Babylonian Talmud by the late Chief Rabbi of Great Britain, J.H. Hertz, who, like Rabbi Finklestein, was one of the 120 Jews chosen in 1937 by the Kehillas of the World as best holding up the "lamp of Judaism:"

The beginnings of Talmudic literature date back to the time of the Babylonian Exile in the Sixth pre-Christian Century When a thousand years later, the Babylonian Talmud assumed final codified form in the year 500 after the Christian era, the Roman Western Empire had ceased to be. (See Exhibit 30).

Rabbi Hertz extolls the Babylonian Exile, saying: "The Babylonian Exile is a momentous period ... During that Exile Israel found itself. It ... rediscovered the Torah and made it the rule of life ..."

What he really means is that it was discovered how the Torah or Bible could be used as a "whited sepulchre" for Babylonian degeneracy, as even a cursory study will reveal.

One Rabbi Akiba was a First Century Talmud "sage," of whom Moses was even supposedly jealous! (See Exhibit 32). Rabbi Hertz lauds Rabbi Akiba (Exhibit 32):

Akiba was the author of a collection of traditional laws out of which the Mishna actually grew. He was the greatest among the rabbis of his own and of succeeding times His keen and penetrating intellect enabled him to find a Biblical basis for every provision of the Oral Law.

Still enthusing over the Babylonian derivation of Pharisaism, Rabbi Hertz continues (See Exhibit 34):

When we come to the Babylonian Gemara, we are dealing with what most people understand when they speak or write of the Talmud. Its birthplace, Babylonia, was an autonomous Jewish center for a longer period than any other land; namely from soon after 586 before the Christian era to the year 1040 after the Christian Era 1626 years. (Exhibit 34)

[page 3] You will note in reproductions of Talmud pages that the word "Gemara" designates the argumentation of the rabbis, the ultimate decision being summarized as the "Mishnah."

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