The Talmud And Bible Believers

Chapter Summary

The supreme hatred of Talmudic Judaism is reserved for and directed against the hated "adherers to the text" of Scripture who are, thus, accused of spurning the words of the Pharisee "Sages," as enshrined in the Babylonian Talmud. These "adherers" to the Bible are classified as the primary enemies of Judaism. They are all "idolators," "heathen," "goy." They rank not only as animals — like the rest of the non-Jewish human race, but as the lowest and most despised form of life. The Talmud frequently refers to Bible adherents scathingly as "Samaritans" and "Cutheans," phraseology similarly used to excoriate Christians.

The Sadducees were the first of these enemies. They were the constant opponents of the Pharisees and their imported Babylonian paganism, misrepresented by the Pharisees as the Tradition of the Elders, the "Oral Law" ostensibly transmitted privately to Moses and on down, superseding anything written in the Bible.

In the six years of civil war between the Pharisees and Alexander Jannaeus, King and High Priest of Jerusalem, 50,000 were killed on both sides before this Sadducean ruler succumbed, and his widow Salome turned affairs over to the Pharisees in 79 B.C. Her brother, Simon ben Shetah, had been waiting for such an opportunity. The continued civil war resulted in the sons of Alexander Jannaeus, Hyrcanus and Aristobulus, in 63 B.C., going hat in hand to Pompey, Caesar's Roman General in Syria, asking him to invade Palestine and slaughter their respective opponents. This is how Rome happened to be in power when Christ was born. Only after Christ's Ascension did the Pharisees triumph.

Other enemies have been the Samaritans, whom Our Lord seemed to favor. They had been brought in from Cutha and other far places in the World Assyrian Empire, to take the place of the ten Israel tribes deported in 721 B.C. They had adopted Biblical Judaism and opposed the return from Babylon in 536 B.C. of the Pharisee-run population.

Each year a handful of Samaritans celebrate Passover on the site of their former temple at Mt. Gerizim, an event contemptuously referred to by American Jewish writers.

The Karaites arose in the 8th century in Babylonia under Anan to plague the Pharisee top element by scorning the Talmud and holding up the Bible as supreme authority. A molten stream of hatred, therefore, was turned on them. With true Talmudic "Brotherhood" and "tolerance," Anan was expelled from Babylonia, and founded the Karaite sect in Jerusalem. Later, when the few remaining thousands of Karaites were favored by the Czar of Russia, although classed as "untouchables" by Talmudists, the latter offered to join the Karaites to get immunity from Czarist displeasure — but the Karaites turned them down as hypocrites.

The supreme curses the Karaites have shared with Christians are due to the adherence of the Karaites to the Bible, instead of the "sages," or Jewish Talmud. They are likened to the Sadducees and Samaritans in this. (See Exhibit 16, Exhibit 24, Exhibit 25, and Exhibit 26).

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