The Jewish Cabala

The existence of a spirit world, of evil spirits, is mentioned throughout the Bible. Christ drove out possessing spirits. There is one hard and fast rule taught on the subject, however: namely, to leave them alone, do no invoking or communicating with them. It is clear that spirit elements could deceive the finite powers of human beings.

"Thou shalt have no other gods before me," is the First Commandment. "And that you shall do no bowing to, or serving them," is the Second Commandment. (Exodus 20:3-5).

Whereas the Bible represents God as the Supreme Intelligence, Creator and Ruler, the pagan and atheist Judaistic concept is pantheism. In other words, there is a great nature essence, out of which individual lives percolate blindly without direction. "Pan" (nature) "theism" (god-ism) holds that the sum of nature is god. Man becomes the all powerful Luciferian "god."

It is foretold in Biblical prophecy that the Anti-Christ will personify that concept (Isaiah 14:12-19; Daniel 11:36-38; Matt. 24:15; Mark 13:14).

The Universal Jewish Encyclopedia (1943), as to the "Cabala," states:

"Although Palestine was the birthplace of Jewish mysticism, the land where the Cabala was conceived, it was in Babylonia that it attained its greatest importance." It cites "the mystic speculations of the Talmud and the system of the Cabala, originating in the one and reaching its completion in the other."

The Jewish Cabala is a library of literature, all on magic, spiritism, and based on sheer pantheism. "Aaron ben Samuel is credited with bringing the mysterious doctrine from Babylonia to Italy about the middle of the Ninth Century; thence it spread to almost all the Christian countries of Europe." (same Jewish Encyclopedia, page 616) Cabala, also spelled Kabbalah, means "tradition," and it is the tradition of the paganisms of Babylon, Egypt, and the pagan philosophers, enshrined in the Jewish religion.

Exhibits 285 through 292 herein (285, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292) each deal with the Cabala.

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