Swearing Falsely the Kol Nidre

The Bible teaches:

"And ye shall not swear by name falsely neither lie one to another I am the Lord" (Leviticus 19:11,12, etc.).

One of the handiest devices provided by the Talmudic "Sages" to offset Moses' laws against swearing falsely, is found in the Talmud book of Nedarim (Vows), and is put into practice yearly in every synagogue across the world as the "Kol Nidre" (all vows). (See Exhibit 171)

The text of the Kol Nidre may be found in the Jewish Encyclopedia [Exhibit 303]. Three times the Cantor, to a tune that sounds like the melodious grief of all ages, pompously intones the words: "All vows, obligations, oaths ... whether called 'konam,' 'konas,' or by any other name, which we may vow or swear, or pledge, or whereby we may be bound, from this Day of Atonement until the next (whose happy coming we await), we do repent. May they be deemed absolved, forgiven, annulled, and void and made of no effect . . The vows shall not be reckoned vows; the obligations shall not be obligatory; nor the oaths be oaths."

The confirming reply of the Congregation is typical of blasphemous Judaistic misuse of the Bible. Three times a verse from Numbers is chanted. It actually concerns the duty of a congregation which has violated the laws of God, in ignorance, to repent, and states:

"And it shall be forgiven, all the congregation of Israel, [page 20] and the stranger that sojourneth among them; seeing all the people were in ignorance." (Numbers 15:26)

Here is a typical Talmudic situation: Knowingly, in advance, every shred of truth is to be cast away, with religious support. A Scriptural verse of no relevance whatsoever is used as justification.

With the Jewish Kol Nidre, not only is there no repentance involved, as in the Bible itself, but forthright, blatant disavowal and annulment of solemn oaths an entire year in advance.

The text of the Kol Nidre also appears in the Talmud, Book of Nedarim, 23a. (See Exhibit 171 and Exhibit 172)

The Talmud Mishna states: "EVERY VOW WHICH I MAY MAKE IN THE FUTURE SHALL BE NULL. HIS VOWS ARE THEN INVALID PROVIDING THAT HE REMEMBERS THIS AT THE TIME OF THE VOW." The Kol Nidre is repeated on the following page. Discounting the irrelevant "filler" about a man eating with his friend, we see in a footnote (Exhibit 172):

"This may have provided support for the custom of reciting Kol Nidre (a formula for dispensation of vows) prior to the Evening Service of the Day of Atonement . But Kol Nidre as part of the ritual is later than the Talmud [as] the law of revocation in advance was not made public."

However, this advance disavowal of oaths, and sanction of perjury, did become known at various times. The Jewish Encyclopedia account [Exhibit 303] concerning Kol Nidre relates how this practice of revoking all vows to be made, a year in advance, was used in European countries to bar the oath of a Jew as of no value.

Contemporaneously, however, as we have been in ignorance of the Kol Nidre and what it means, such oaths, no matter how valueless, are foolishly accepted in our Courts.

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