More Talmudic Wisdom

Pretensions of "wisdom" by Talmudic Pharisee "sages" are perhaps the most incredible. No pompous dissertation seems complete without mention of a privy. Sons of "sages" and scholars, we read may "enter and sit down before their father, with their backs to the people."

When, however, they do not possess the capability of understanding the discourses, "they enter and sit down before their father with their faces toward the public . if he went out to ease himself he may re-enter and sit down in this place. . This applies only to the minor functions of the body but not to the major functions since he should have examined himself before . A man should always make a habit of easing himself early in the morning and late in the evening in order that there be no need for him to go far ..." (See Exhibit 197 and Exhibit 198)

Jewish Talmud "remedies" are foolish to say the least. The above passage from Horayoth 13a-b of the Talmud is replete with learning such as: "As the olive causes one to forget seventy years of study, so does olive oil restore seventy years of study. . Wine and spices have made me wise." (Exhibit 96)

The Talmud "sages" then dispute whether dipping one or two fingers in salt makes one wise; whether passing under the [page 29] bit of a camel, or under the camel itself, interferes most with mentality. The text then returns to the required protocol for the "Nasi, head of the Sanhedrin, and the head of a Talmud school, the Ab-Beth Din," and how many rows have to rise in honor when each one enters. (Exhibit 197)

The Talmud also has "wisdom about eating dates." "They remove three things: evil thoughts, stress of the bowels, and abdominal trouble." This leads to a play on words, door, ladder and bed, where "one is fruitful and multiplies on it" — back to the old subjects. This is from Kethuboth 10b-11a of the Talmud.

On this same page is the Mishnah (law) that a baby girl under three years and one day old is always reckoned as a virgin: "If they had intercourse before they were three years and one day old the hymen would grow."

Do not just the few illustrations above from the Pharisee Talmud show the justness of Christ's excoriations of the Pharisees as: "Full of all uncleanness;" their love of the "uppermost rooms at feasts. . . all their works they do for to be seen of men" — "full of hypocrisy and iniquity?" (Matthew 23:5-6, 27-8, etc.)

And, illustrating their hairsplitting paraded as "wisdom," He called them "fools and blind." (Matthew 23:17-19)

0 0

Post a comment