From a Roof

The Talmud book of Yebamoth also concerns the duty to marry a brother's widow who is childless. Two volumes of junk and obscenity for its own sake carry the title, Yebamoth. Another illustration of the "reprobate mind" is the teaching that [Yebamoth 54a] if a man falls from a roof "and his fall resulted in accidental insertion," as [Ybamoth 54a footnote] "When in a state of erection the levir fell from a raised bench upon his sister-in-law who happened to be below." Here the great Talmudic "saint" Rashi is cited as authority. "His commentary on the Talmud is a consummate masterpiece, a remarkable and gigantic work," says the 1943 Universal Jewish Encyclopedia. Rashi was born in Troyes, France, 1040, and died there in 1105.

The above Talmud passage is not reproduced here. It is in Yebamoth 53b-54a (page 356 of the Soncino edition) and continues the above with the responsibility of a "levir" or brother-in-law "when, for instance, his intention was intercourse with his wife and his sister-in-law seized him and he cohabited with her." [Yebamoth 54a] The passage is merely an excuse to indulge the "reprobate mind" in uncleanness. (Romans 1:28) Is it any wonder that Christ likened Pharisees to "unseen graves" (Luke 11) and "whited sepulchres" (Matt. 23)?

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