Babylon

What the Cross means to Christianity, "Babylon the Great" means to the cult of Judaistic Pharasaism.

Babylon was the "Vatican," center, and spiritual homeland of Pharasaic Babylonian Talmudism, as Chief Rabbi Hertz has put it, from 586 B.C. to 1040 A.D., when the last of the Talmud

"academies" moved out into Europe, Asia and Africa from Babylonia. (Exhibits 33-34) The "glory" of Babylon is referred to in the Talmud. (Rodkinson introduction, Exhibit 18).

And from Babylon, to Africa, Europe and all over the world, Pharisaism and its Traditions (Talmud) went, so that the Jew today repeats Pharisaic arguments when he studies Talmud, says Rabbi Louis Finkelstein, of the Jewish Theological Seminary, one of Jewry 's world top Jews. (Exhibit 2)

From Talmud "academies" in Babylon, at Sura, Hehardea, Nisibis, Pumbeditha, Talmudic ideas and decisions went out and were accepted by the "Jews" of the world. The Jewish Encyclopedia, considering "the general influence of Babylonia upon European Judaism," states: "The West received both the written and the oral Law from Babylonia," and even after the close of the Talmudic "glories" in Babylon (1040 A.D.): "Babylonia, however still continued to be regarded with reverence by the Jews in all parts . in the Ninth Century . Jews of Abyssinia placed 'the sages of Babylon' first in their prayers ... a similar prayer, although it has quite lost its application, is extant today in many congregations. Rabbi Paltiel of Cairo contributed one thousand gold pieces to the schools of Babylonia . in accordance . with a custom prevalent in all places where Jews dwelt . . Toward the end of the Twelfth Century Benjamin of Tudela ... relates that the 'nasi' of Damascus received his ordination from the academic head of Babylonia so that this country was still predominant in the minds of the Jews of the Moslem world." (Jewish Encyclopedia, "Babylonia," Exhibits 295-296)

Nasi (prince), is a head of the Sanhedrin, or ruler of temporal affairs of Jewry; the Ab Beth Din is the religious head and joint ruler with the Nasi in Pharisaism. There were five of these "pairs" before 70 A.D.

A Babylonian Talmud passage on Babylon, exalts it as the "centre of religion and learning." (Kethuboth 11 1a, Exhibit 146)

The complete devotion to Babylon of the Pharisee Jewish religion may be seen if only by reading the Jewish Encyclopedia. Reproduced herein are two pages of the Jewish Encyclopedia section on "Babylonia." (Exhibit 295-296) These illustrate the proud and devoted attitude of Pharisaism toward Babylonia, which is the glory and source of their Pharisee tradition, the Talmud. Until 1040 A.D., we read, the Talmud-Cabala academies in Babylonia shone — then finally closed to spread Talmudic "learning" to the rest of the world, moving up through Spain and across Europe. We also read that "the Academy of Sura ... reached a point of unprecedented splendor ... Pumbedita ... in 1040 also passed away after an existence of 800 years . Babylonian learning should be transplanted to Europe . This forms an appropriate point at which to consider the general influence of Babylonia upon European Judaism . the West received both the written and the Oral Law from Babylonia."

The supreme place in Judaism given the Babylonian Talmud and the word Babylonian used on the title page of its every volume, are other indications of the Babylonian character of "Judaism" so-called.

The "Foreword" to the Soncino English translation of the Babylonian Talmud by the late Chief Rabbi of Great Britain, J.H. Hertz, is another indication. (See Exhibit 34, etc.) Also consider the tribute paid to Babylon in the History of the Talmud accompanying the first (1903) English translation of the Babylonian Talmud by "Rodkinson" (M. Levi Frumkin). (See Exhibit 34, etc.)

[page 39] Contrast the so-called Palestinian Talmud, which, says Chief Rabbi J.H. Hertz, one of "Jewry's 120 world leading Jews," was for many centuries almost forgotten by Jewry. Its legal decisions were at no time deemed to possess validity, if opposed by the Babylonian Talmud." (See Exhibit 33)

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