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together became one, so may thy church be gathered together from the ends of the earth into thy kingdom.?

(g) It symbolizes the coming joy and perfection of the kingdom of God.

<422218> Luke 22:18 ? ?for I say unto you, I shall not drink from henceforth of the fruit of the vine, until the kingdom of God shall come?; <411425>Mark 14:25 ? ?Verily I say unto you, I will no more drink of the fruit of the vine, until that day when I drink it new in the kingdom of God?.

<402629> Matthew 26:29 ? ?But I say unto you, I shall not drink henceforth of this fruit of the vine, until that day when I drink it new with you in my lather?s kingdom.?

Like Baptism, which points forward to the resurrection, the Lord?s Supper is anticipatory also.

It brings before us, not simply death but life, not simply past sacrifice but future glory. It points forward to the great festival, ?the marriage supper of the Lamb? (Revelations 19:9). Dorner: ?Then Christ will keep the Supper anew with us and the hours of highest solemnity in this life are but a weak foretaste of the powers of the world to come.? See Madison Avenue Lectures, 178-216; The Lord?s Supper, a Clerical Symposium, by Pressense, Luthardt and English Divines.

B. Inferences from this statement

(a) The connection between the Lord?s Supper and Baptism consists in this, that they both and equally are symbols of the death of Christ. In Baptism, we show forth the death of Christ as the procuring cause of our new birth into the kingdom of God. In the Lord?s Supper, we show forth the death of Christ as the sustaining power of our spiritual life after it has once begun. In the one, we honor the sanctifying power of the death of Christ, as in the other we honor its regenerating power. Thus both are parts of one whole, setting before us Christ?s death for men in its two great purposes and results.

If baptism symbolized purification only, there would be no point of connection between the two ordinances. Their common reference to the death of Christ binds the two together.

(b) The Lord?s Supper is to be often repeated, as symbolizing Christ?s constant nourishment of the soul whose new birth was signified in Baptism.

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