University Groups on the Move

School officials and professors, to be sure, offer the main line of attack on Christians and Christian values, but they are closely supported by various other institutional arms of the university. The aforementioned professor Mike Adams told of the work of the Women's Resource Center at UNC-Wilmington in steering pregnant students to the rabidly pro-abortion Planned Parenthood, while trying to impede efforts of pro-life groups to provide counseling services. Notably, research has emerged showing that the majority of women who have abortions experience some kind of emotional or psychological problem. Yet groups like the Women's Resource Center and Planned Parenthood, which bill themselves as pro-choice, curiously don't seem to want pregnant women exposed to all the relevant information to enable them to make an informed and reasoned decision. Such behavior, rife on university campuses as well as in society at large, clearly bespeaks of an extreme pro-abortion mentality. This extremism is especially evident in an e-mail disseminated by a similar group, the Women's Center at UNC-Chapel Hill. The group tried to deflect criticism of "partial-birth abortion" by calling it an "inflammatory term invented by the right wing."

A particularly egregious case of discrimination occurred at Washington University in St. Louis, where the Student Bar Association (SBA) denied official status and funding to a group of anti-abortion law students based on the content of the group's beliefs. According to the SBA, the group's focus was "too narrow." And just how was the Law Students Pro-Life (LSPL) organization too narrowly focused? Well, according to the SBA, the group was not authentically pro-life because it did not include in its constitution a denunciation of the death penalty. "If your group truly has the purpose they claim, they need to consider revamping the organization to encourage and facilitate discussion of the issues as a whole, and not simply the pro-life side of certain issues," said SBA president Elliot Friedman.

The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) wrote a letter to the administration, pointing out the "dreary intolerance and breathtaking double standard" the university was waging against the group. FIRE noted that the SBA had approved other "narrowly focused" groups, such as the Jewish Law Society, which was committed to "fulfilling the needs of Jewish students," and the Black Law Students Association, organized "to orient, assist, and otherwise support African-American students." FIRE also organized a nationwide publicity campaign to bring attention to the Washington University antilife discrimination. After twice denying the group official recognition, the SBA finally reversed itself on October 15, 2002, and granted official recognition to the LSPL organization.

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