Other Campus Censorship

Not surprisingly, conservative journalists are often the targets of liberal bias and intolerance on university campuses. A group of thieves stole twenty-two stacks of Liberty's Flame, the University of California-Davis's conservative newspaper, and dumped them in a recycling bin. Prior to the incident, the publication's writers had received insulting e-mails accusing them of bigotry and promoting segregation. Among the paper's editorial positions that inflamed campus liberals was its exposure of the allegedly anti-American goals of a Mexican group called MEChA.

Large-scale thefts of conservative newspapers have been reported in universities across the nation, including Brown, UC-Berkeley, Georgetown, and Villanova. Perhaps it would be marginally less troublesome if these acts of vandalism and censorship were condoned by only small numbers of radical students. But in case after case, faculties defend these actions. One Cornell spokesman said that burning an issue of The Cornell Review in 1998 was justified on First Amendment grounds-as if that were the issue. The president of Georgetown denounced its conservative paper instead of condemning those who confiscated every issue of it. At Villanova, the school's dean of students was the mastermind of the theft of the entire issue of a conservative publication. And student activists at Yale stole the freshman orientation issue of the campus paper Light and Truth because it criticized a freshman "safe sex" program promoting risky sexual behavior in the guise of "sexual liberation:' The article's sin was to condemn the program's encouragement of one-night stands and the like.

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