Hollywood Bias

Sanitizing and Excusing Violence by Islamic Extremists

The mean-spiritedness that characterizes so much of the news media's treatment of Christianity is also on display in Hollywood, where, among other things, we again see a sanitized treatment of radical Islamic violence. Author and movie critic Michael Medved pointed out that Hollywood's latest crop of terrorist movies depicted terrorists as anything but Islamic fanatics bent on killing Americans and destroying the United States. In the movie Bad Company, the terrorists are Yugoslav extremists planning to detonate a stolen nuclear bomb under Grand Central Station. In The Sum of All Fears, neo-Nazi European industrialists are the terrorists of choice who-adding insult to injury-buy a lost Israeli bomb intending to unleash it at the Super Bowl, hoping to start a full-blown nuclear war between America and Russia.

What's worse, the Tom Clancy novel upon which this movie is based had Muslims as the terrorist group, but Arab-American lobbyists pressured Paramount Pictures to change their identity. By way of contrast, said Medved, Hollywood made no effort to change the identity of our enemies from previous world wars. Medved also noted the "unique Islamic imperative to impose theocracy. From Pakistan to Saudi Arabia, from Iran to Nigeria (or at least that part of the country controlled by Islam), theocratic regimes impose a brutal, medieval version of Koranic law." Medved has a valid point. While the media and other liberal forces constantly portray efforts of Christian groups to restore religious freedom in America as attempts to impose theocracy, liberals rarely report on real-life theocracies in Muslim countries.

The UK-based Institute for the Study of Islam and Christianity (ISIC) says there is a "disturbing trend" among politicians and the media to make excuses for Muslim violence by blaming those who create the conditions that presumably give rise to the violence rather than focusing on the perpetrators of the violence. As an example, the institute cited an instance in which Western journalists blamed Christian missionaries in Afghanistan for the death threats the Taliban issued against them because the missionaries were "not being ... sensitive to the local culture." Likewise, according to the ISIC, when Muslims killed eight people during riots in India, many in the media implied that it was the fault of Reverend Jerry Falwell because he had made disparaging comments about Islam.

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