Discrimination by the Postal Service

This politically correct wartime attitude spilled over into the post office. During Gulf War II in April 2003, Jack Moody, Jr. tried to send his son, Pfc. Daniel Moody, Scriptures and religious comic books. The postal service in Lenoir, North Carolina, refused to send the material, citing a government regulation. Jack Moody said, "He [Daniel] wrote a letter to his mom and I, saying he was reading the Bible for strength. He asked us to send this stuff, so I called the post office and told them what I wanted to do. After the postal supervisor confirmed their policy, I got upset. If this was through the Kuwait or Saudi Arabian post office, I could understand. But it was the U.S. post office." The policy to which Moody referred stated, "Any matter containing religious materials contrary to Islamic faith or depicting nude or seminude persons, pornographic or sexual items, or non-authorized political materials is prohibited."

Attorneys from Rutherford said that the postal regulation, along with the orders that soldiers not wear religious jewelry, indicates a "willingness to subjugate American freedoms for the sake of not offending those in the Middle East." Rutherford president John W. Whitehead observed that the regulation was "content-based discrimination" aimed at Christian materials and essentially endorsed the Islamic faith over all other religions. "At a time when members of our armed forces are risking their lives as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom," Whitehead said, "it is inconceivable that their own freedoms and those of their parents would be curtailed by the U.S. government in an effort to impose political correctness on our armed forces. The U.S. Constitution does not bow to the religious intolerance of other nations."

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