Anti Life TV

Network television also gets its digs in against Christians and their values, such as the high regard they place on human life and protection of the unborn. In Absolute Strangers, a 1991 TV movie, Henry Winkler's character seeks a court order to abort his comatose wife's baby to save her life. Then the "absolute strangers" show up, two firebreathing pro-life intermeddlers, and fight for legal guardianship over the child so that the pregnancy can proceed to term." Though the movie was based on real-life events, pro-life advocates say it was extremely one-sided. Reverend Donald E. Wildmon of the American Family Association said, "It's a pro-abortion movie." Henry Herx, director of the U.S. Catholic Conference Office for Film and Broadcasting, complained about the movie's casual treatment of the abortion question. "It seems to me the decision for the abortion was made rather quickly and without deep consideration," said Herx. "One would think they would want to build up the moral dilemma and feel the pain of the husband."

The 1996 star-studded HBO movie If These Walls Could Talk hit abortion opponents from a number of angles. First set in 1952, Demi Moore's character, a widow, pregnant after a one-night stand, dies in a failed illegal abortion. Fast forward twenty years, and a married woman (Sissy Spacek) with four children, living in the same home that Moore's character occupied, discovers she's again pregnant. While deciding whether to terminate her pregnancy, she is harangued by her hippie daughter. Another twenty years later, still in the same location, a third woman (Ann Heche), is impregnated by her married college professor. Pro-life activists surround the abortion clinic where the woman is planning to obtain an abortion. In an ensuing altercation, an anti-abortion fanatic murders the pregnant woman's loving physician, played by Cher. One synopsis of the movie glowingly described it as "a poignant examination of the evolution of the abortion debate, beginning with the tragedy of illegal back-alley abortions and ending with the violence so prevalent at women's clinics today."

An episode of "Law and Order" on NBC took its shot in January 2003, featuring an insane pro-life introvert stalking and murdering an abortion doctor. Although incidents like this have occurred in real life, they are extraordinarily rare occurrences involving lunatics and are completely unrepresentative of the pro-life movement, which is entirely peaceful and respectful, in stark contrast to the lucrative but grisly violence and disrespect meted out hourly on unborn human beings in abortion clinics across America.

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