Protestants Concur

Perhaps you are wondering what the Protestant bodies think of these things we have been considering. They will speak for themselves. Here are some candid admissions of those churches upon the Sabbath question. All statements are taken from the most authoritative spokesmen. Here is a quotation from Dr. Edward T. Hiscox, the author of the Baptist Manual: "There was and is a commandment to keep holy the Sabbath day, but that Sabbath day was not Sunday. It will be said, however, and with some show of triumph, that the Sabbath was transferred from the seventh to the first day of the week. ... Where can the record of such a transaction be found? Not in the New Testament—absolutely not. ... Of course, I quite well know that Sunday did come into use in early Christian history as a religious day, as we learn from the Christian Fathers, and other sources. But what a pity that it comes branded with the mark of paganism, and christened with the name of the sun god, when adopted and sanctioned by the papal apostasy, and bequeathed as a sacred legacy to Protestantism!" (From a paper read before a New York ministers' conference held November 13, 1893.) This great Baptist leader condenses into a few sentences all that has been said in the pages of this booklet.

The Presbyterian Christian at Work said this: "Some have tried to build the observance of Sunday upon apostolic command, whereas the apostles gave no command on the matter at all. ... The truth is, as soon as we appeal to the litera scripta (the literal writing) of the Bible, the Sabbatarians have the best of the arguments." Ed. April 19, 1883. The Methodist Theological Compendium states: "It is true that there is no positive command for infant baptism ... nor is there any for keeping holy the first day of the week."

Dr. W. R. Dale (Congregational) in The Ten Commandments, pp. 106, 107, says: "It is quite clear that however rigidly or devotedly we may spend Sunday, we are not keeping the Sabbath. The Sabbath was founded on a specific, divine command. We can plead no such command for the observance of Sunday. ... There is not a single line in the New Testament to suggest that we incur any penalty by violating the supposed sanctity of Sunday."

The Lutheran position, as revealed in the Augsburg Confession of Faith, states: "The observance of the Lord's day (Sunday) is founded not on any command of God, but on the authority of the church." Episcopalian spokesman Neander writes in the History of the Christian Religion and Church, p. 186:

"The festival of Sunday, like all other festivals, was always only a human ordinance, and it was far from the intentions of the apostles to establish a divine command in this respect, far from them and from the early apostolic church to transfer the laws of the Sabbath to Sunday"

In Ten Rules For Living, by Clovis G. Chappell we read: "We ought to remember that the Sabbath is God's gift to man. We realize, of course, that our Sabbath is not the same as that observed by the Jews. Theirs was the seventh day of week, while ours is the first. The reason we observe the first day instead of the seventh is based on no positive command. One will search the Scriptures in vain for authority for changing from the seventh day to the first. The early Christians began to worship on the first day of the week because Jesus rose from the dead on that day. By and by, this day of worship was made also a day of rest, a legal holiday. This took place in the year 321. Our Christian Sabbath, therefore, is not a matter of positive command." Page 61.

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