An Attempted Change

To answer this question we are pointed back again to Daniel 7:25, where the papacy is described as a power who would "think to change times and laws." We have learned already how the second commandment was removed and the tenth commandment divided in the catechisms of the papacy. But what about the "times" mentioned in the text? Where only is time mentioned in the law? It is in the fourth commandment. Did the papacy think to change the Sabbath, the only time designated by the law? Yes, it did, and it happened in a most interesting way.

The pagans had a system of religion based on sun worship. Their sacred day was the first day of the week, which they named Sun-Day in honor of the sun god. Sunday was observed by the pagans in contrast to the Sabbath observance of Christians. But in the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine, a significant thing happened. Constantine professed conversion to Christianity and opened the doors of the church to all his heathen followers.

In order to gain power, prestige, and greater numbers to the church, he accepted many of the customs of sun worship from the pagans. Many of these compromises, such as Christmas and Easter, have already been described. Another of those customs was the observance of Sunday. It appeared more convenient to let the pagans keep their own day of worship on Sunday and ask the Christians to join them in it. So Constantine actually made the first law about keeping Sunday instead of the Sabbath. Papal church councils strengthened that law until it became firmly entrenched in Christianity and the world.

The Testimony of History

Turning now to the witness of secular historians, you may read the facts for yourself. Every statement is clearly defined in the historical records. From the Encyclopedia Britannica under the article "Sunday" we read: "It was Constantine who first made a law for the proper observance of Sunday, and who ... appointed that it should be regularly celebrated throughout the Roman Empire." Here are the words of Dr. Gilbert Murray, M.A., D. Litt., L.L.D., F.B.A., professor of Greek at Oxford University: "Now since Mithras was 'The Sun, the Unconquered,' and the Sun was the 'Royal Star,' the religion looked for a King whom it could serve as the representative of Mithras upon earth. ... The Roman Emperor seemed to be clearly indicated as the true King. In sharp contrast to Christianity, Mithraism recognized Caesar e as the bearer of the divine Grace, and its votaries filled the legions and the civil service. ... It had so much acceptance that it was able to impose on the Christian world its own Sun-Day in place of the Sabbath, its Sun's birthday, twenty-fifth of December, as the birthday of lesus." History of Christianity in the Light of Modern Knowledge.

Dr. William Frederick states the same historical truth: "The Gentiles were an idolatrous people who worshipped the sun, and Sunday was their most sacred day. Now, in order to reach the people in this new field, it seems but natural, as well as necessary, to make Sunday the rest day of the Church. At this time, it was necessary for the Church to either adopt the Gentiles' day or else have the Gentiles change their day. To change the Gentiles' day would have been an offense and stumbling block to them. The Church could naturally reach them better by keeping their day." Sunday and Christian Sabbath, pp. 169,170.

The North British Review gives the following reasons for the Christians adopting the heathen Sunday: "That very day was the Sunday of their heathen neighbors and respective countrymen, and patriotism glad ly united with expediency in making it at once their Lord's day and their Sabbath. ... That primitive church, in fact, was shut up to the adoption of the Sunday, —until it became established and supreme, when it was too late to make another alteration." Volume XVIII, p. 409.

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