The Primitive Wisdom Religion

Strictly speaking, it is difficult to view the Jewish Book of

f A division indicative of time.

J Sanchoniathon calls time the oldest ^on, Protogonos, the "first-born."

ยง Philo Jud^us, "Cain and His Birth," p. xvii.

Genesis otherwise than as a chip from the trunk of the mundane tree of universal Cosmogony, rendered in Oriental allegories. As cycle succeeded cycle, and one nation after another came upon the world's stage to play its brief part in the majestic drama of human life, each new people evolved from ancestral traditions its own religion, giving it a local color, and stamping it with its individual characteristics. While each of these religions had its distinguishing traits, by which, were there no other archaic vestiges, the physical and psychological status of its creators could be estimated, all preserved a common likeness to one prototype. This parent cult was none other than the primitive "wisdom-religion." The Israelitish Scriptures are no exception. Their national history โ€” if they can claim any autonomy before the return from Babylon, and were anything more than migratory septs of Hindu pariahs, cannot be carried back a day beyond Moses; and if this ex-Egyptian priest must, from theological necessity, be transformed into a Hebrew patriarch, we must insist that the Jewish nation was lifted with that smiling infant out of the bulrushes of Lake Moeris. Abraham, their alleged father, belongs to the universal mythology. Most likely he is but one of the numerous aliases of Zeruan (Saturn), the king of the golden age, who is also called the old man (emblem of time).** It is now demonstrated by Assyriologists that in the old Chaldean books Abraham is

** Azrael, angel of death, is also Israel. Ab-ram means father of elevation, high-placed father, for Saturn is the highest or outmost planet.

called Zeru-an, or Zerb-an โ€” meaning one very rich in gold and silver, and a mighty prince.* He is also called Zarouan and Zarman โ€” a decrepit old man.+

0 0

Post a comment