Cambridge University Press

Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, Madrid, Cape Town, Singapore, Sao Paulo Cambridge University Press The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge CB2 8RU, UK Published in the United States of America by Cambridge University Press, New York www.cambridge.org Information on this title www.cambridge.org 9780521853781 Annette Yoshiko Reed 2005 This publication is in copyright. Subject to statutory exception and to the provision of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take...

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Henrichs and L. Koenen, Der Kolner Mani-Kodex ber das Werden seines Leibes (Opladen, 1988). Genesis Rabbah ed. H. Albeck and J. Theodor, Bereshit Rabba mit Kritischem Apparat und Kommentar. 3 vols. (Jerusalem, 1965). Septuaginta Vetus Testamentum Graecum vol. I Genesis, ed. J. W. Wevers (G ttingen, 1974). J. Naveh and S. Shaked, Magic Spells and Formulae Aramaic Incantations of Late Antiquity (Jerusalem, 1993). J. Charlesworth, ed., The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha. 2...

Subdocuments and manuscripts of 1 enoch

BW Book of the Watchers (1 En. 1 -36). Sim. Similitudes of Enoch (1 En. 37 -71). AB Astronomical Book (1 En. 71 -82). BD Book of Dreams (1 En. 83-90). EE Epistle of Enoch (1 En. 91 -105 6 7). AW Apocalypse of Weeks (1 En. 93 1 -10 91 11 -17). AA Animal Apocalypse (1 En. 85-90). GrPan Codex Panopolitanus M. Black and A. Denis, eds. Apocalypsis Henochi Graece Fragmenta Pseudepigraphorum (Leiden, 1970)

Introduction

Ci he book of genesis tells us precious little about the figure of Enoch. In the course of presenting a genealogical list of those who lived before the Flood, it notes his Sethian ancestry via Jared (5 19) and his fathering of Methusaleh (5 21). We find only hints of his special status the other men in the genealogy merely live, propagate, and die, but Genesis states twice that Enoch walked with God (5 22, 24). And rather than tell his death in straightforward terms, it recounts that he was no...

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Obtained by humankind, even as its appeal to the fallen angels ironically allows for the assertion of their authentically supernatural origin. At first sight, the mantic teachings described in 1 En. 8 3 c-g seem similar in thrust and motivation. These teachings invoke the widespread distrust of the marginal yet powerful figure of the diviner, as found both in the Hebrew Bible and in Greco-Roman literature. As with spell-binding and sorcery, the practice of divination is explicitly prohibited in...

The book of the watchers in historical and social context

Prior to the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, it was commonplace for scholars of Second Temple Judaism to locate the production of all apocalypses in conventicles, small groups of antiestablishment prophets or visionaries who cultivated secret wisdom, isolated from the community at large.8 Taking Daniel as the model for the genre as a whole, scholars speculated that powerlessness and persecution drove the composition of apocalypses behind every apocalypse lurked a disenfranchised group whose...

Knowledge sin and secrecy in 1 en 1216

Whatever the precise derivation of 1 En. 6-11, the task of interweaving its potentially antispeculative strands with the descriptions of Enoch's revelations in 1 En. 17-36 is masterfully achieved by the transitional chapters of 1 En. 12-16. The sins of the Watchers are here described in the context of Enoch's commission to rebuke them. This framework enables the integration of traditions about the fallen angels with traditions about the elevation of Enoch, thereby facilitating the combination...

Topics of Angelic Teaching

The instruction motif also serves a more mundane etiological function, helping to explain how specific types of knowledge and skills first came to be adopted by humankind.31 Although modern scholars have tended to focus on the Book of the Watchers' etiology of evil, the precise topics of angelic instruction prove no less significant for our understanding of 1 En. 6-11. On the one hand, the choice of topics helps to illumine the concerns of its authors redactors and original audience. On the...

Translations and commentaries of 1 enoch

Black, The Book of Enoch or 1 Enoch A New English Edition (Leiden, 1985). R. H. Charles, ed. and trans., The Book of Enoch or 1 Enoch (Oxford, 1912). J. Flemming and L. Radermacher, eds. and trans., Das Buch Henoch, herausgegeben im Auftrage der Kirchenvater-commission der K niglich preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften (Leipzig, 1901). M. A. Knibb, The Ethiopic Book of Enoch A New Edition in Light of the Aramaic Dead Sea Fragments. 2 vols. (Oxford, 1978). J. T. Milik,...

From Scribalism to Sectarianism The Angelic Descent Myth and the Social Settings of Enochic Pseudepigraphy

The composite nature and complex redaction-history of the Book of the Watchers point to its origins, not in the vision of a single author, but rather in the hands of a series of authors, redactors, and tradents. The previous chapter surveyed some of the scribal concerns that dominate this apocalypse we noted its elevation of Enoch as a scribe of righteousness (1 En. 12 3-4 15 1) and its self-consciousness about the power ofwriting, as well as its scientific, exegetical, and epistemological...

Approaches to Angelic

When read from this perspective, the repetitions and contradictions within 1 En. 6-11 provide important insights into the organizational principles that governed the selection and redactional arrangement of traditional material. Diverse traditions are not simply conflated, harmonized, nor resolved into a single story. Rather, one can discern an attempt to interweave the various strands into a meaningful whole through the imposition of a literary structure, however loose. 16 For a survey of...

Two Perspectives on Angelic Sin and Secret Knowledge

Within 1 En. 12-16, two passages elaborate 1 En. 6-11 's descriptions of the sins of the Watchers, retelling the angelic descent myth by means of rebukes and instructions to rebuke. In 1 En. 12 4-13 3, the Watchers of great Holy One tell Enoch to rebuke the Watchers of heaven who have left the highest heaven for their sexual misdeeds and the violent results (12 3-6). Enoch then rebukes Asael, noting their improper revelation of knowledge and the sinful results (13 1 -2). In 1 En. 15 2-16 4, the...

The Descent of the Watchers and the Elevation of Enoch

Even as 1 En. 12-16 includes the interpretation of illicit angelic instruction as improper due to its corruption ofhumanity, this unit thus privileges a concern with the proper epistemological boundaries between heaven and earth. On the level of the redacted text, the ramifications are striking. The antispeculative tendencies in 1 En. 6-11 are not simply subsumed into the rest of Book of the Watchers. Instead, 1 En. 12-16 treats this tension as generative. The productive combination of...

Angelic Descent and Apocalyptic Epistemology The Teachings of Enoch and the Fallen Angels in the Book of the Watchers

Clj efore exploring the jewish and christian transformations of the Enochic myth of angelic descent, we must first ask how the fallen angels and their teachings function within the Book of the Watchers itself. Our inquiry into the reception-history of this apocalypse necessitates a focus on the redacted form of the text, the form in which (most) Jews and Christians would encounter it. In light of its complex literary history, however, the contents of the apocalypse cannot be addressed apart...