From Scribalism to Sectarianism The Angelic Descent Myth and the Social Settings of Enochic Pseudepigraphy

The composite nature and complex redaction-history of the Book of the Watchers point to its origins, not in the vision of a single author, but rather in the hands of a series of authors, redactors, and tradents. The previous chapter surveyed some of the scribal concerns that dominate this apocalypse we noted its elevation of Enoch as a scribe of righteousness (1 En. 12 3-4 15 1) and its self-consciousness about the power ofwriting, as well as its scientific, exegetical, and epistemological...

Approaches to Angelic

When read from this perspective, the repetitions and contradictions within 1 En. 6-11 provide important insights into the organizational principles that governed the selection and redactional arrangement of traditional material. Diverse traditions are not simply conflated, harmonized, nor resolved into a single story. Rather, one can discern an attempt to interweave the various strands into a meaningful whole through the imposition of a literary structure, however loose. 16 For a survey of...

Two Perspectives on Angelic Sin and Secret Knowledge

Within 1 En. 12-16, two passages elaborate 1 En. 6-11 's descriptions of the sins of the Watchers, retelling the angelic descent myth by means of rebukes and instructions to rebuke. In 1 En. 12 4-13 3, the Watchers of great Holy One tell Enoch to rebuke the Watchers of heaven who have left the highest heaven for their sexual misdeeds and the violent results (12 3-6). Enoch then rebukes Asael, noting their improper revelation of knowledge and the sinful results (13 1 -2). In 1 En. 15 2-16 4, the...

The Descent of the Watchers and the Elevation of Enoch

Even as 1 En. 12-16 includes the interpretation of illicit angelic instruction as improper due to its corruption ofhumanity, this unit thus privileges a concern with the proper epistemological boundaries between heaven and earth. On the level of the redacted text, the ramifications are striking. The antispeculative tendencies in 1 En. 6-11 are not simply subsumed into the rest of Book of the Watchers. Instead, 1 En. 12-16 treats this tension as generative. The productive combination of...

Angelic Descent and Apocalyptic Epistemology The Teachings of Enoch and the Fallen Angels in the Book of the Watchers

Clj efore exploring the jewish and christian transformations of the Enochic myth of angelic descent, we must first ask how the fallen angels and their teachings function within the Book of the Watchers itself. Our inquiry into the reception-history of this apocalypse necessitates a focus on the redacted form of the text, the form in which (most) Jews and Christians would encounter it. In light of its complex literary history, however, the contents of the apocalypse cannot be addressed apart...