The Jewish Calendar

The Jewish calendar is a lunar calendar and each month begins on a day of the new moon. To even up the lunar calendar with our solar calendar, an extra month is added every 3 months or 7 times in 19 years according to Kevin Conner [The Feasts of Israel 1980 Bible Temple Pubs]. This is why Passover [and Easter], Jewish New Year and Tabernacles fall at different times of the year in our solar calendar. Passover comes in the first month of the Jewish religious calendar, named Aviv also known as [a.k.a.] Nisan. Tabernacles comes in the seventh month, named Tishri.

Here's a little chart of how the months run.

Solar Calendar

Sacred Calendar

Civil Calendar

March-April

Aviv or Nisan

Tishri

April-May

Iyyar

Heshvan

May-June

Sivan

Kieslev

June-July

Tammuz

Tebeth

July-August

Ab or Av

Shebat

August-September

Elul

Adar

September-October

Tishri

Aviv or Nisan

October-November

Heshvan

Iyyar

November-December

Kieslev

Sivan

December-January

Tebeth

Tammuz

January-February

Shebat

Ab or Av

February-March

Adar and Adar II

Elul and Elul II

In years where an extra month is added, the extra month comes at the end of the religious year. So in those years you have Adar I and Adar II. This means that there is a constant set of intervals between the Passover feasts and the Tabernacles feasts. And that Nisan is always the first month of the religious year, Tishri is always the seventh month of the religious year and the first month of the civil year.

If you think this is confusing, you're right.

I have found that many of the authorities, who are supposed to be experts on this stuff will give you differing dates for the feasts. [Authorities are like lawyers or economists, if you have three of them in the same room, you'll get 5 opinions.]

To make things more interesting, the Jewish calendar day changes at 6pm in the afternoon instead of at 12 midnight.

If you think this is confusing, you're really right. The Layout of Passover

Here's an example going back to material from The Passover Pattern. Some authorities claim Passover falls on the 14th and some claim it falls on the 15th. The catch is that the day begins at 6pm in the Jewish calendar. So, it works like this.

On the 10th of Nisan, they take a lamb from the flock. It's inspected for 4 days. On the 14th the lamb is killed and roasted, from 3 - 6pm. At 6pm, the day changes to the 15th. Then the lamb is eaten.

Also, on the 15th begins the first day of The Feast of Unleavened Bread. It runs for 7 days. On the 16th is the feast of First Fruits.

The 16 is also the first day of the Counting of the Omer. This is where 50 days are counted off till Pentecost.

So as near as I can figure it out it works like this.

The 14th of Nisan or Aviv is called 'The preparation of the Passover'.

The 15th is called Passover and the beginning of Unleavened Bread.

The 16th is called First Fruits or day 1 of the Omer.

Day 1 of the Omer is the first day of the 50-day count leading to Pentecost a.k.a. Shavuot. Pentecost falls on Sivan 6.

[Some authorities [Kevin Conner, in The Feasts of Israel, 1980] claim that First Fruits falls on the 18th as that is the day of Jesus resurrection. I use a Jewish Calendar Program that runs on Windows called Kaluach. You can down load it Here; it's about 400KB. This calendar shows day 1 of the Omer on the 16th, but it does not specify a day for First Fruits, [Bikkurim in Hebrew]. Eddie Chumney says, "Today, this festival is not observed in traditional Judaism." The Seven Festivals Of The Messiah Eddie Chumney http://www.hebroots.com]

Now here is the layout of the Fall Feasts a.k.a. Tabernacles.

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