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Figure 7.

Joachim and Anna, the parents of the Virgin. Vat. ms. gr. 1613. (Photograph:

Courtauld Institute of Art)

Figure 7.

Joachim and Anna, the parents of the Virgin. Vat. ms. gr. 1613. (Photograph:

Courtauld Institute of Art)

version attached to the Acts of Pilate, but may well be older.[32] Much-loved themes in later homiletic are already well developed here: the announcement to the dead souls by John the Baptist of the coming arrival of Christ to release them, the dialogue between Satan and Hades, the attempt to bar the gates of Hell and their bursting asunder, the arrival of Christ in glory, and the binding of Satan and the raising of the dead. The Greek homilies of the fourth to the sixth centuries on the theme, often wrongly attributed and still largely in need of modern editing, make of these components a dramatic drama with heightened and even comic dialogue.[33] Whether or how these Greek homilies are re-

[32] See Hennecke-Schneemelcher 1:470-476; J. Kroll, Gott und Holle. Der Mythos vom Descensus-Kampf, Studien der Bibliothek Warburg 20 (Leipzig, 1932; repr. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1963).

[33] See G. La Piana, Le rappresentazioni sacre nella letteratura bizantina dalle origine al secolo IX (Grottaferrata, 1912); S. MacCormack, "Christ and Empire: Time and Ceremonial in Sixth-Century Byzantium and Beyond," Byzantion 52 (1982): 287-309; for the vivid manner, with frequent apostrophe and exclamation as well as dialogue, see C. Datema and P. Allen, Leontii presbyteri Constantinopolitani Homiliae, Corpus Christianorum series graeca 17 (Turnhout: Brepols, 1987), intro.

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