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Figure 5.

Provincial splendour: Aphrodisias, Tetrapylon. Second century A.D.

(Photograph: Aphrodisias Excavations, M. Ali Dogenci)

Figure 5.

Provincial splendour: Aphrodisias, Tetrapylon. Second century A.D.

(Photograph: Aphrodisias Excavations, M. Ali Dogenci)

speaking communities of the coastal cities. Anyone who has traveled in North Africa or Turkey will know the extent to which, by the end of the second century, any city of note had adopted an increasingly Roman appearance, sometimes owing to Roman, or even imperial, initiative, but more often the work of the local wealthy elite who rushed to imitate their Roman patrons and rulers. And with the grandiose Romanized architecture went Romanized styles of government. In Rome itself the people no longer counted (how could they, when the empire was so huge?), and the provincial cities, too, were now run by and in

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