On The Dao De Jing Tao Te Ching

The Dao De Jing (Tao Te Ching) or Laozi (Lao Tzu) is a very important book for studying Chinese philosophy. Its other title, when it was written and by whom remain questions that scholars have long discussed. Some assert that it was written by Lao Ran (6th century B.C.) who was the teacher of Confucius. Most Chinese, however, believe that it was perhaps written later around the fifth century B.C. because some of its paragraphs criticize certain Confucians who lived around the Fifth century B.C....

General Background

The development of Daoism (Taoism) iwj an attempt to orientate the Han Chinese to their social, political, economic, moral and psychological lives at the end of the Eastern Han. Why did Daoism (Taoism) develop only at the end of the Eastern Han period Historically, such Daoist ideas, as 'immortality' and 4sancti-fication of the bodies' had already existed during the time of the Warring States (Zhanguo). They became even more popular during the Qin and Han dynasties--why We know that not just...

In Ancient China

In my essay On the Problem of Truth, Goodness and Beauty in Chinese Philosophy, I suggested that the conceptions of truth, goodness and beauty rest on three propositions the unity of Heaven and man, the unity of knowledge and action, and the unity of sentiment and scenery. Among these, the unity of Heaven and man is the most fundamental, and it is from this that the other two unities are derived. The unity of knowledge and action requires that people realize both the heavenly Way and the human...

Of Traditional Chinese Philosophy

The term category has myriad definitions in the history of philosophy in the West. Aristotle in his Categories treated it as the basic mode of being and put forward ten categories such as substance, quantity, quality, relation, place, time, state, action and passion. And Kant described his twelve categories as principles related to cognition or as the precondition for constituting experience. Lenin said Categories are stages of distinguishing, i.e., of cognizing the world, focal points in the...