Walter Brueggemann

the theology of the book of jeremiah

The Book of Jeremiah, second of the three major prophets, is immensely complex. Its different interpretive voices stretch across several generations and do not cohere into an easily identifiable and uniform theology. Instead, in both poetry and prose, the Book of Jeremiah witnesses an ongoing conversation among different advocates concerning the crisis of Babylon's expansion and Jerusalem's demise. In this volume, Walter Brueggemann elucidates these various voices in the context of Judah's commitment to the rule of the one God, Yhwh. This messy interface of the theological and political constitutes the primal challenge of the Book of Jeremiah, and Brueggemann shows how the book asserts that God continues to be similarly and disturbingly operative in the affairs of the world. In this way, contemporary crises such as American imperialism and religiously inspired terrorism are shown to be dislocations with ancient antecedents, but dislocations that continue to invite readers to new futures that combine divine agency and human inventiveness rooted in faithfulness.

Walter Brueggemann is William Marcellus McPheeters Professor Emeritus of Old Testament at Columbia Theological Seminary. Although his impact on the study of much of the biblical canon is widespread, he is probably best known for his scholarship on the Psalms and prophetic literature. His many books include An Introduction to the Old Testament: The Canon and Christian Imagination and Theology of the Old Testament: Testimony, Dispute, Advocacy, and he will co-author, with William H. Bellinger, Jr., the two-volume New Cambridge Bible Commentary on the Psalms.

old testament theology general editors

Brent A. Strawn,

Assistant Professor of Old Testament Theology, Candler School of Theology

Patrick D. Miller,

Charles T. Haley Professor of Old Testament Theology, Princeton Theological Seminary

This series aims to remedy the deficiency of available published material on the theological concerns of the Old Testament books. Here, specialists explore the theological richness of a given book at greater length than is usually possible in the introductions to commentaries or as part of other Old Testament theologies. They are also able to investigate the theological themes and issues of their chosen books without being tied to a commentary format or to a thematic structure provided from elsewhere. When complete, the series will cover all the Old Testament writings and will thus provide an attractive, and timely, range of short texts around which courses can be developed.

forthcoming volumes

The Theology of the Book of Genesis, R. Walter L. Moberly The Theology of the Book of Leviticus, Brent A. Strawn The Theology of the Book of Judges, Joel S. Kaminsky The Theology of the Book of Psalms, Patrick D. Miller The Theology of the Book of Ecclesiastes, J. Gerald Janzen The Theology of the Book of Daniel, Anathea Portier-Young The Theology of the Book ofHosea, Christine Roy Yoder The Theology of the Book of Amos, John Barton

In grateful memory of

Shirley C. Guthrie

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