And The Idea Of God 215

in its totality," he declares,1 "has the care of all inanimate or soulless being everywhere, and traverses the whole universe, appearing in divers forms. When it is perfect and its wings have fully grown, it soars upward and orders the whole world; but when it loses its wings, it sinks downward, till it reaches the solid ground and takes up its abode in an earthly btody, which seems to move of itself but is really moved by the souL And this compound of soul and body is called a living and mortal creature: for immortal no such union can be believed to be, though our sensuous imagination, not having seen or knowtt the nature of God, may picture him as an immortal creature having a body and a soul which are united through all time."

It appears, then, that in the PhaeoLrus the soul is taken as the principle of all things, to which all movement—all activity and actuality—must ultimately be referred. It is the one absolutely universal, and therefore absolutely individual existence, which determines itself and is not determined by anything else, and which for that reason is immortal and etemaL Thus souls seem to attract to themselves the characteristics of ideas, or, at least, to take the place of ideas, as ultimate principles of being and knowing. Further, Plato seems to attribute soul in this sense, not only to men, but to all living

1 Phaedrus, 246 b.

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