The Platonic Idealism 101

Things together' i.e. it is to be found only in some principle which explains all the diversities of experience in consistency with each other. The Gorgias is the dialogue in which the reconsti-tution of ethics upon the new basis begins. In it Plato insists, not, as in the purely Socratic dialogues, upon the opposition of ignorance and knowledge, but upon the opposition, and at the same time the relation, of opinion and knowledge, or, in other words, of the apparent and the real in morals....

The Immortality Of The Soul

In that dialogue we have the negative thought, that the soul cannot he destroyed by any evil derived from another than itself, in the Phaedrm we have the positive counterpart of this, that it is determined, and can only be determined, by itself. It has a universal nature and, therefore, it transcends all limits or hindrances that can be put upon it by other things. They cannot affect it, or they can affect it only indirectly through its own action. Even its confinement in a mortal body is...

The Platonic Idealism

Ordinary moral judgments of men and his method of achieving it had consisted simply in bringing such judgments together, comparing them, showing their agreements and differences, and using one of them as a negative instance to correct the hasty hypothesis suggested by another for itx this way he hoped to find a principle which would explain thfem all, showing the amount of truth contained in each, and accounting for the error that was mingled with it. Thus, just as Newton from the many apparent...

And The Idea Of God 201

Put into it by direct experience or by teaching, it is attributed to the memory of a former state of existence, a memory which has become dulled and .obscured by the descent of the spirit into the world of sense. This memory may be revived by reflexion and dialectic, though it cannot be completely restored till death liberates the soul from the body and its affections. The soul, therefore, is to be conceived as remaining unchanged in its essential nature through all the processes of birth and...

And Their Systematic Unity 115

Elements, but a transparent and unchanging unity. But, as such, it is invisible, and cannot be presented to sense or imagination, but only grasped by the intelligence and the intelligence which grasps it must itself be of kindred nature to it. Furthermore, even the intelligence can only grasp such a unity when it withdraws into itself from the confusions of sehse which distract and disturb its pure activity. For when in its perception of things it uses the body as its instrument, apprehending...

The Theory Of Ideas 191

To a further result, which also is recognised by Plato. As we have seen, Plato requires us to conceive the idea as the unity of the opposite principles of the Eleatics and the Heracliteans, and, therefore, as com-bining in itself unity and difference, permanence and change. This, however, means that an idea must be conceived as a self-determining or active principle since only that which is self-determined can be said to transcend these oppositions, to maintain its unity in difference and its...

The Precursors Of Plato

Like the first emergence of the plant from underground where its germinative forces have been slowly maturing. We can see however, that it was very natural Cor Socrates, as for other teachers in a similar ' position, to exaggerate the difference between conscious morality and that which is relatively' unconscious. His whole purpose, his essential work and vocation, was to awaken men to reflexion, to arouse them to a clear consciousness of themselves, to call upon them to take life seriously and...

And The Idea Of God 210

The New Testament God is not the God of the dead, but of the living. And perhaps this is the one argument for immortality, to which much weight can be attached. It appears, then, that Plato's proof of the immortality of the soul ultimately resolves itself into the ontological argument for the being of God or rather, we should say, that it is what that argument becomes when freed from its dualistic presuppositions. In other words, it is a regressive argument, which carries us back to an ultimate...