The Death Of Christ

31. Because God not only wills the salvation of all men; not only hath purposed to save them all; not only hath promised it; not only hath confirmed that promise by an OATH (see previous issues); but also hath provided the means, in the death of Christ, for the salvation of all men. Jesus died for all. "He gave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time." (1 Tim. 2:6) "But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the an gels, for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honor; that he, by the grace of God, should taste death for every man." (Heb. 2:9) "And he is the propitiation for our sins; and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world." (1 John 2:2) Here are three expressions: 1st, "ALL;" 2nd, "EVERYMAN;" 3d, "THE WHOLE WORLD." It seems as though the sacred writers took the utmost care to guard against being misunderstood in this important particular. Some would have us believe (see Prof. Stuart's Com. on Heb. 2:9) that these expressions are to be understood only in a general sense, in opposition to the contracted opinions of the Jews, who confined the blessings of God to their own nation only; and that the words are intended to declare, that Jesus died for Gentiles as well as Jews. We cannot so restrict the sense. Look at the connection in which these passages are found, and it will be seen that the terms used, apply to all men, in the widest sense of these terms. Paul instructs Timothy to pray for all men; not for Jews and Gentiles in the general sense, but for kings and all in authority; for this is good and acceptable in the sight of God, who will have all men to be saved. So John says, "if any man sin, we have an Advocate with the Father." (1 Epistle John 1:1) Is not the language here designed to apply to all men: Who can dispute it?

32. The labor of Christ will be efficacious for all for whom He died. "He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied." (Is. 53:2) "And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all men unto Me." (John 12:32) If the Redeemer died for all men, can He be satisfied with the salvation of a part only? Can He look back upon his work and say, it is well done? Will He not rather draw all men unto Him, by the power of His truth, and make them holy and happy forever? Are we not authorized to expect such a result, from the fact, that He gave Himself a ransom for all? And if they are all drawn unto Him, will they not all be saved?

33. When Jesus was born, the angel said to the fearful shepherds, "Behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people." (Luke 2:10) The tidings of the Redeemer's birth, were certainly good tidings to all people. They should all hear these tidings, and to all they should be good tidings. But how can this be, if a part of the human race are never to be benefited by the Redeemer's sacrifice?

34. The people who heard Jesus preach said, "we have heard Him ourselves, and we know that this is indeed the Christ, the Savior of the world." (John 4:42) Jesus cannot be the Savior of the world, if the world will never be saved. What Jesus taught the Samaritans, that induced them to regard Him as the Savior of the world, may be inferred, 1st. from His conversation with the woman at the well of Jacob, (John 4) and 2nd, from the exclama tion of the Samaritans, in the 42nd verse. He evidently did not preach to them the doctrine of endless misery; for would they have concluded from the fact of his preaching that doctrine, that he was THE SAVIOR OF THE WORLD?"

35. John, the beloved disciple of Christ, said, "We have seen, and do testify, that the Father sent the Son to be the Savior of the world." (1 John 4:14) This is the same character that the Samaritans judged the Lord to possess, from his personal instruction. (John 4:42) John says, "We have seen;" i.e. he knew it from his acquaintance with his Master. And do testify. We cannot hide this truth; we will proclaim to men, that Jesus is the Savior of the world.

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